EXPLORE GRANVILLE

Rolling green hills and lush forests surround a charming village with so much to discover, making it an ideal place either to visit for a day or weekend, or stay for a lifetime.

The town has long been considered the Colored Slate Capital of the World for its many stone quarries that produce a rare variety of colors, including green, gray, gray black, purple, mottled green and purple, and red.

In addition to thriving industry, the Village of Granville has a bustling retail scene with both chain and specialty shops, a variety of eateries and professional services, and a rich cultural life with institutions like the Pember Library and Museum of Natural History and the Slate Valley Museum.

Opportunities to enjoy the great outdoors abound, too, with parks, a recreation trail and the Mettawee River all to be found within the village borders. Granville has so much to see!

The History of Granville, NY

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Pre-Settler

The St. Francis Native Americans, or Western Abenaki, appear to have frequented what is now the town of Granville, having fished and hunted in the area for ages, finding here their best beavers.

1700s

While the town was founded in New York in 1780, by the next year, residents petitioned to place themselves under the jurisdiction of Vermont to ensure protection during the American Revolution. As a result, the border area between Vermont and New York was for a long time not clearly under control of either state.

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1700s

While the town was founded in New York in 1780, by the next year, residents petitioned to place themselves under the jurisdiction of Vermont to ensure protection during the American Revolution. As a result, the border area between Vermont and New York was for a long time not clearly under control of either state.

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1800s

Slate was discovered near Middle Granville around 1850, and the slate business really began to thrive a few decades later. At the time, slate was used for roofing of houses and barns, which you can still see today atop historical buildings like Harvard University’s Memorial Hall, which uses red slate from Granville.

Today

Today, the “Slate Valley” extends approximately twenty-four miles along the New York/Vermont border from Granville, NY north to Fair Haven, VT. Telescope Casual Furniture moved to Granville in 1921, where it still operates today.

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Today

Today, the “Slate Valley” extends approximately twenty-four miles along the New York/Vermont border from Granville, NY north to Fair Haven, VT. Telescope Casual Furniture moved to Granville in 1921, where it still operates today.

Plan Your Trip to Granville

Events in Granville

Stay up to date with events in Granville and throughout Washington County

How to Get to Granville

The Village of Granville is nestled in the Mettawee River Valley, a gateway to both the Adirondack Mountains and the Lakes Region of Vermont.

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Granville Businesses