Greenwich

EXPLORE GREENWICH

Located just east of Saratoga Springs among green rolling hills, Greenwich offers visitors and residents great restaurants, attractive shops, and many leisure activities with quick access to some of New York’s and Vermont’s best recreation areas.

 

The Village of Greenwich on the banks of the Battenkill, a nationally recognized trout stream, has been called “the most extraordinary, beautiful and architecturally intact village in all of upstate New York.” Rich with Victorian and Greek revival architecture, village greens and gardens, the Nineteenth Century storefronts that line Main Street provide distinctive dining and shopping in a historic small town environment.

 

Discover the area’s historic role in the Revolutionary War, the French and Indian War, Women’s Suffrage, and the Underground Railroad in the Village of Greenwich and Easton. In August, visit the Washington County Fair, “an agricultural tradition for over a century,” one of the state’s biggest and best.

The History of Greenwich, NY

Icon of a valley

1700s

The Horicon tribe is believed to be part of the early native population of Greenwich, with families settling in the area around 1763. Likewise, early European settlers were attracted by the advantages of water power.

Grist mills and sawmills were followed by woolen, cotton, flax and land plaster mills. Later, paper mills and farming became the backbone of the town’s economy.

Early 1800s

The Town of Greenwich was part of five different land patents until it was set off as a separate Town in 1803. The Village of Greenwich was first known as Whipple City, named for Job Whiple, its first successful industrialist. The village was the incorporated and renamed Union Village, but the name was again changed in 1867 to Greenwich.

Icon of a boat on water

Early 1800s

The Town of Greenwich was part of five different land patents until it was set off as a separate Town in 1803. The Village of Greenwich was first known as Whipple City, named for Job Whiple, its first successful industrialist. The village was the incorporated and renamed Union Village, but the name was again changed in 1867 to Greenwich.

Icon of a train on its tracks

Late 1800s

he movement for the abolition of slavery was guided by Dr. Hiram Corliss in Greenwich. As such, the town was an important “station” of the Underground Railroad.

In 1895, the Greenwich and Schuylerville Electric Railroad was established, providing trolley transportation from the Capital District to Warrensburg until it was later absorbed by the Hudson Valley Railroad.

Today

The village remains a trading center for the local area, with several locally-owned retail stores, car dealerships, restaurants, craft beverage taprooms and business services dotted along the main streets. You can take a self-guided walking tour of historic locations and of the buildings involved in the Underground Railroad.

Icon of a government building

Today

The village remains a trading center for the local area, with several locally-owned retail stores, car dealerships, restaurants, craft beverage taprooms and business services dotted along the main streets. You can take a self-guided walking tour of historic locations and of the buildings involved in the Underground Railroad.

Plan Your Trip to Greenwich

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Events in Greenwich

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How to Get to Greenwich

With its west town line defined by the Hudson River and the BattenKill running through it, Greenwich lies in the Cambridge Valley region of southern Washington County.

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